How to Grow Wild Ginger Plants

Overview

Wild ginger is a small herb that typically grows to about 6 inches in height and 12 inches in diameter. The plant received its name because of it tastes and smells like ginger. Wild ginger is grown primarily as a ground cover, but because it's not invasive, numerous plants must be planted to cover the soil. Wild ginger plants are easy to grow and require little care once established.

Step 1

Select a planting site for wild ginger that receives full shade throughout the day. Spread a 1-inch layer of organic compost over the planting site and use a garden tiller to mix it into the soil.

Step 2

Dig a hole of equal depth and twice as wide as the root ball of the wild ginger plant. Place the root system into the hole and gently cover with soil. Water thoroughly to compact the soil and bring moisture into contact with the roots. Space wild ginger plants 12 inches apart.

Step 3

Water wild ginger once per week during the first two months of growth. Reduce frequency to once every 10 days thereafter. Do not allow the soil to dry out completely at any time or the plant will begin to wilt.

Step 4

Feed wild ginger plants once every two months using a balanced 10-10-10 NPK fertilizer. Follow the manufacturer's directions for proper application and dosage. Water immediately after applying to release the nutrients into the soil.

Step 5

Prune wild ginger in early spring just before new growth begins. Remove any damaged or diseased foliage to increase the health and appearance of the plant. Do not prune before winter, as the plant will not be able to recover during the cold weather.

Tips and Warnings

  • Wild ginger is not to be confused with true ginger, Zingiber officinale. Never consume wild ginger plant.

Things You'll Need

  • Organic compost
  • Garden tiller
  • Fertilizer

References

  • University of Wisconsin Department of Horticulture: Wild Ginger
  • Cornell University Flower Growing Guides: Wild ginger
  • "Perennial All-Stars: The 150 Best Perennials for Great-Looking, Trouble-Free Gardens;" 2002; Jeff Cox
Keywords: wild ginger, wild ginger plants, wild ginger plant

About this Author

Willow Sidhe is a freelance writer living in the beautiful Hot Springs, AR. She is a certified aromatherapist with a background in herbalism. She has extensive experience gardening, with a specialty in indoor plants and herbs. Sidhe's work has been published on numerous Web sites, including Gardenguides.com.