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How to Use an Aloe Vera Plant

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How to Use an Aloe Vera Plant

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Overview

Aloe vera plants have been used for thousands of years on wounds and skin problems to accelerate healing, according to the Mayo Clinic. Though aloe is also purported to help with other problems, like genital warts and canker sores, the National Institutes of Health say these alternative uses aren't backed by enough research. Regardless, you can use aloe vera on your skin as a home remedy for skin disorders and small cuts.

Step 1

Grow aloe vera. Aloe vera intended for home use is typically kept in a pot. Place the pot on a sunny windowsill and water once or twice daily, or as needed to keep the plant's fleshy leaves plump and green.

Step 2

Break off a leaf from the aloe vera plant, severing it several inches from its base.

Step 3

Squeeze the leaf gently so that the aloe vera plant's translucent green-tinted gel oozes from the leaf's broken end.

Step 4

Rub the aloe vera gel onto your skin where it's needed to treat skin irritations, dryness and sunburn. Spread a thin layer and massage it into your skin with your fingertips.

Step 5

Repeat three to four times daily until the skin irritations or problem subsides, or as directed by a physician.

Tips and Warnings

  • Never self-treat a health disorder or problem without first consulting a medical expert.

Things You'll Need

  • Aloe vera plant

References

  • Aloe Vera Handbook; Max B. Skousen; 2005
  • National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Aloe Vera
  • US National Library of Medicine: Aloe Vera
Keywords: aloe vera plant, aloe uses, grow aloe vera

About this Author

Josh Duvauchelle is an editor and journalist with more than 10 years' experience. His work has appeared in various magazines, including "Honolulu Magazine," which has more paid subscribers than any other magazine in Hawaii. He graduated with honors from Trinity Western University, holding a Bachelor of Arts in professional communications, and earned a certificate in applied leadership and public affairs from the Laurentian Leadership Centre.