• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How to Cook Burdock Root

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How to Cook Burdock Root

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Fresh burdock root, unlike the carrots to which its shape is similar, is not tasty when raw. However, cooking it brings out some of its natural sweet, earthy flavors. It is a staple of Japanese cuisine, and is full of vitamins, minerals and fiber. It is also reputed to be a natural digestive aid. Fresh burdock root is quick and easy to prepare.

Step 1

Peel the burdock roots. Like parsnips and carrots, you should peel these in long strips.

Step 2

Cut burdock roots in half and lay the flat sides down. Slice them lengthwise, thinly, into 1/4-inch thick segments. If the roots are long, cut them in half. If they are very long, cut into thirds. Continue turning and cutting the roots until the pieces look about the size of french fries.

Step 3

Heat your pan over high heat. Add 1 tsp. sesame oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan.

Step 4

Mix burdock root pieces with the soy sauce, mirin and sugar in the bowl until all the pieces get coated.

Step 5

Add the seasoned burdock root pieces to the hot pan. Stir often to cook on all sides and do not burn. They will cook quickly, and will absorb the sauce as they cook. They will start to turn a lovely soy-glazed brown color.

Step 6

Add sesame seeds and chili flakes at the end, if you like. Stir the burdock roots and these last two seasonings all together. Serve at any temperature you like. They can be reheated, but do not require it to taste good.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 to 3 burdock roots
  • 2 tsp. soy sauce
  • 2 tsp. mirin (Japanese sweet cooking wine)
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp. sesame seeds (optional)
  • 1 tsp. crushed red chili pepper flakes (optional)
  • Sharp chef's knife
  • Large skillet or saute pan
  • Long-handled spoon or chopsticks
  • Large bowl
  • Vegetable peeler

References

  • The Japanese Kitchen; Hiroko Shimbo; 2001
  • Mealographer: Burdock Nutrition Facts
Keywords: burdock root cookery, cooking gobo, kinpira gobo recipe

About this Author

Amrita Chuasiriporn is a professional cook, baker, and writer. In addition to cooking and baking for a living, Chuasiriporn has written for several online publications. These include Chef's Blade, CraftyCrafty, and others. Additionally, Chuasiriporn is a regular contributor to online automotive enthusiast publication CarEnvy.ca. Chuasiriporn holds an A.A.S. in culinary arts, as well as a B.A. in Spanish language and literature.

Member Calendar Entries