How to Attach Trellis Lines to the Ground

Overview

Wire or twine trellises are often used when growing pole beans, peas and other vining vegetable crops. Inexpensive to build, wire trellises consist of two support post with a wooden or rope crossbeam stretched between them. Wires hang from the crossbeam, reaching to the ground so the vine plan ts can easily grow up them. These wires, called trellis lines, must be staked to the ground. If left to hang freely they will move in the wind and uproot the plants, killing them in the process.

Step 1

Measure out and cut your trellis lines so they are 1 foot longer than the height of the trellis. Use gardening twine, heavy wire or thin nylon rope for the lines.

Step 2

Attach or tie the trellis lines to the top crossbeam to match the spacing recommended for the plant you are trellising. For example, peas are planted 2 inches apart so attach a trellis line to the crossbeam every 2 inches.

Step 3

Drive in a tent stake or a garden staple into the ground at the base of each trellis line. Push the stake into the ground so just the hook part of the tent stake is visible. Push staples so that just enough space is above ground to pass the trellis line through it.

Step 4

Pass the end of each trellis line through the hook or loop of the corresponding stake or staple.Pull the line taut and tie it around the stake securely.

Step 5

Push the rest of the stake or staple into the ground once the trellis line is attached to it. Use a rubber mallet to finish driving it in if necessary.

Step 6

Plant at the base of each trellis line. Guide the plants onto the line as they begin growing, tying them to the line with cloth plant ties if necessary.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not move the stakes once you have sown the plants. This may disturb or damage the plant roots, killing the plant.

Things You'll Need

  • Measuring tape
  • Trellis lines
  • Stakes or staples
  • Rubber mallet

References

  • Purdue Extension Office: Growing Beans
Keywords: attaching trellis lines, wire trellis, plant supports

About this Author

Jenny Harrington is a freelance writer of more than five years' experience. Her work has appeared in "Dollar Stretcher" and various blogs. Previously, she owned her own business for four years, selling handmade items online, wholesale and via the crafts fair circuit. Her specialties are small business, crafting, decorating and gardening.