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How to Make a Garden Trellis From Soda Bottles

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How to Make a Garden Trellis From Soda Bottles

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Overview

Recycling used soda bottles into a trellis for your garden requires a little ingenuity and creativity. This eco-friendly project can add color and dimension to your outdoor space, while providing support for your climbing plants. You can paint and heat the plastic soda bottles to transform them into colorful, abstract shapes, or decorate them with beaded strands for a sparkling garden trellis.

Step 1

Squirt a variety of colors of acrylic paint inside each of the soda bottles. Swirl the paint around inside the bottle so that the sides are coated. Swirling the paint will give you a marble effect. The number of soda bottles that you need depends on the size and design of your garden trellis as well as how much you shrink the individual bottles. To make a 4-foot tall garden trellis with two, 2-rail side supports and two 3-foot wide top center supports, plan on using six bottles for each of the four vertical side supports, two bottles for each of the four horizontal side supports and four bottles on each of the two top connecting supports. This is a total of 40 soda bottles to make this garden trellis.

Step 2

Pour out any excess paint and allow the paint to dry. Puncture the center of the bottom of each soda bottle after the paint dries.

Step 3

Stack two sets of two concrete blocks, 3 feet apart in a well ventilated area. The blocks will support the wire horizontally as you heat the soda bottles with a heat gun. You can use any type of support; just make sure that the bottles hang freely in the center.

Step 4

Cut four 68-inch lengths of 18-gauge copper wire. The extra 20 inches is to bury the trellis and to bend the wire to make connections. Thread two soda bottles to the center of the wire. Place the ends of the wire on top of the concrete blocks.

Step 5

Heat the soda bottles with a heat gun until the plastic shrinks to form a decorative, abstract shape. Let the plastic cool, then replace the bottles with two more and repeat this step. Shrink all of your painted soda bottles.

Step 6

Insert the four copper wires 18-inches into the ground where you plan to place your garden trellis. Space the two side wires 1 foot apart; space the two trellis sides 3 feet apart.

Step 7

Thread six soda bottles over the top of each wire. If you prefer to use fewer bottles for each vertical support, you can space them by wrapping a small section of wire around the vertical support wire as a stopper.

Step 8

Cut four 18-inch sections of 18-gauge wire. Wrap one end of one wire around one of the vertical side support wires. Place the wire wherever you'd like a rung for your trellis. Thread on two soda bottles and wrap the open end of the wire around the vertical side support that's 1-foot away. Repeat this step once more for this side of your trellis, and twice more for the opposite side of the trellis.

Step 9

Cut two 54-inch sections of 18-gauge wire. Wrap one end of one wire around the top of one vertical side support. Thread four soda bottles over the wire and wrap the open end around the vertical side support that's 3-feet away. Repeat this step with the remaining 54-inch wire strip.

Things You'll Need

  • 2-liter soda bottles
  • Acrylic paints
  • Awl
  • Measuring tape
  • 18-gauge copper wire
  • Wire cutters
  • Blocks
  • Gloves
  • Heat gun
  • Round nose pliers

References

  • Allfreecrafts.com: Recycled Bottle Fish Mobile

Who Can Help

  • Threadbanger.com: How to Make Beads from Old Plastic Bottles
Keywords: soda bottle trellis, plastic bottle trellis, bottle trellis

About this Author

Katherine Kally is a freelance writer specializing in eco-friendly home improvement projects, practical craft ideas and cost effective decorating solutions. As a content creator for Demand Studios and private clientele, Kat's work is featured on sites across the web. Kally holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of South Carolina and is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists.