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How to Make Wheat Germ Oil

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How to Make Wheat Germ Oil

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Overview

Wheat germ is the embryonic portion of the wheat kernel and is high in oil content. Wheat germ, once separated from the kernel, can be pressed to obtain that oil. The oil is light in both color and flavor. Wheat germ oil delivers a significant amount of tocopherol, also known as vitamin E. In fact, one teaspoon of wheat germ oil delivers more than 33 percent of the daily recommended amount of vitamin E. A simple screw-type press can be used to make wheat germ oil at home.

Making Wheatgerm Oil

Step 1

Obtain an amount of fresh, separated wheat germ.

Step 2

Disassemble the oil press and make sure it is clean from the last pressing. Reassemble the press.

Step 3

Place the two receptacles in the correct position to collect the pressed oil and the cake that is spent during pressing

Step 4

Fill the feed hopper with wheat germ. Turn the oil press by hand or switch on the electric motor that operates the press.

Step 5

Watch the feed hopper. As it empties, add more wheat germ. If the hopper gets jammed, stop the press and clear the hopper so that the wheat germ will flow freely.

Step 6

Examine the oil and cake receptacles. Replace the oil receptacle when full. Empty the cake receptacle as required.

Step 7

Place the freshly pressed oil in a warm area to let any solids in the oil settle out. Pour the oil off of the solids the next day.

Things You'll Need

  • Wheat germ
  • Screw press
  • Receptacles for oil and spent cake

References

  • Nutritional Data: Oil, Wheat Germ
  • Piteba: Guide to making Edible Oils
  • The World's Healthiest Foods: Whole Wheat
Keywords: wheat germ oil, press wheat germ oil, make wheat germ oil

About this Author

Located in Jacksonville, Fla, Frank Whittemore has been a writer and content strategist for over 15 years, providing corporate communications services to Fortune 500 companies. Whittemore writes on topics that stem from his fascination with nature, the environment, science, medicine and technology.