How to Pot an Amaryllis

Overview

Amaryllis bulbs are often available in winter, frequently sold as holiday-themed flowers. These bulbs are simple to force for winter blooms, bringing color inside during the holidays when little else is flowering. Amaryllis have large red or white flowers atop long flower stalks. The bell-shaped flowers bloom for up to eight weeks. Potting the amaryllis bulb properly forces it into bloom at the right time to use in your home as a centerpiece for the holiday table.

Step 1

Choose a pot 2 inches larger than the diameter of the amaryllis bulb, as they prefer being slightly pot -bound. Place ½ inch of gravel in the bottom of the pot so the bulb fits inside snugly on all sides.

Step 2

Fill the pot halfway with a potting mix sold for use with bulbs. Mix your own potting mix by combining equal parts leaf mold, loam and coarse sand.

Step 3

Set the amaryllis bulb in the soil with the neck part facing up. Finish filling the pot with the soil until two-thirds of the bulb is buried.

Step 4

Water after potting until it begins to drip from the bottom drainage holes. Keep the soil slightly moist, watering as the surface begins to dry out, until the plant begins flowering.

Step 5

Place the pot in a 70- to 75-degree F room in a brightly lit, southern exposure window until it begins flowering. Amaryllis blooms approximately eight weeks after being potted.

Step 6

Move the plants to a 65-degree F room once they begin flowering. If you can't move them during the day, place them where there is lower temperatures at night to prolong the blooms. Water more frequently once the flowers bloom, providing enough water so the soil surface does not dry out.

Tips and Warnings

  • Too much nitrogen in fertilizers may stop the amaryllis from blooming. Use a balanced fertilizer or a high-phosphate fertilizer.

Things You'll Need

  • Pot
  • Gravel
  • Leaf mold
  • Loam
  • Sand

References

  • University of Georgia Extension Office: Amaryllis
Keywords: potted amaryllis, growing amaryllis, Christmas flower

About this Author

Jenny Harrington is a freelance writer of more than five years' experience. Her work has appeared in "Dollar Stretcher" and various blogs. Previously, she owned her own business for four years, selling handmade items online, wholesale and via the crafts fair circuit. Her specialties are small business, crafting, decorating and gardening.