Propagating Gerbera Daisy

Overview

Gerbera daisies can grow from seed to flower in about 16 weeks. Their propagation is usually accomplished by seed. These seeds are very small and have to be protected from light or they will quickly lose their viability. The plants are very popular as annuals but in Africa they grow as perennials. You can expect several months of blooming and even the cut flowers will last for 14 days. Planting the seeds require just a few considerations.

Step 1

Prepare your planting container with drainage, whether it is a tray or plant pot. Fill it with potting soil and water until the water drains out. You will need a place for it to grow either in full sun or under lights where it can get 12 hours of light per day and where the temperature is around 70 degrees.

Step 2

Sprinkle the seeds very lightly on top of the soil. They are so small that they do not need to be covered with soil just make contact so press the top of the soil lightly. Mist them with water.

Step 3

Cover the whole container with a plastic bag. You want to provide a humid environment for them and keeping the plastic bag over them will accomplish this. Set it in a sunny or well lit place.

Step 4

Remove the plastic from the container after two weeks. Any seeds that were viable will have germinated by this time. Water the seedlings as they emerge with mistings, After they have a couple of leaves, allow the top of the soil to dry before watering.

Step 5

Transplant the seedlings carefully to larger pots where they can grow to full size. The gerbera daisy can get up to 18 inches high and 24 inches wide. Expect blooms in about 14 to 16 weeks after planting.

Things You'll Need

  • Gerbera seeds
  • Potting soil 2:2:1 (Peat moss:sand:loam)
  • Container
  • Misting spray bottle
  • Plastic bag
  • Plant pots for transplanting

References

  • Alabama Cooperative Extension: Greenhouse Production of Gerbera Daisies
  • University of Oklahoma Department of Botany & Microbiology: Gerbera jamesonii
Keywords: gerbera daisy, propagation, seeds, flowers

About this Author

Based in Maryland, Heidi Braley, currently writes for local and online media outlets. Some of Braley's articles from the last 10 years are in the "Oley Newsletter," "Connections Magazine," GardenGuides and eHow.com. Braley's college life included Penn State University and Villanova University with her passions centered in nutrition and botany.