How to Make Fresh Cut Roses Last Longer

Overview

Roses are a common cut flower given as a gift or placed in a home for decoration. With proper care and handling the roses will last for one to two weeks depending on their freshness at the time of purchase. Cut roses have a shortened life span when the stem becomes blocked or if placed in areas where the temperature is over 75 degrees F.

Step 1

Choose a clean vase or container that is large enough to hold the flowers and stems. Clean and rinse the vase thoroughly with diluted bleach and water prior to using.

Step 2

Remove all leaves and foliage from the lower portion of the stems. Only stems should be in the water, as foliage will promote bacteria growth and shorten the cut roses' life span.

Step 3

Cut 2 to 3 inches off the bottom of the stems at an angle with a sharp knife. Do not use scissors, a knife or a clipper that is dull or will cause the stem to crush slightly, as this will decrease water absorption.

Step 4

Fill the vase with lukewarm water and add a floral preservative powder if it came with the bouquet. Substitute 1 tbsp. vinegar and 1/2 tsp. sugar if you don't have any floral preservative. Mix to dissolve.

Step 5

Place the roses into the vase. Double check to make sure there is no foliage in the water. Check the water level daily and re-cut the stems every two days to prevent the stems from becoming blocked.

Step 6

Place the flowers in a cool location out of the range of a heat vent, fireplace, TV or other electronic equipment that generates heat.

Step 7

Remove drying flowers and foliage as they appear.

Things You'll Need

  • Clean vase
  • Bleach
  • Water
  • Sharp knife
  • Floral preservative
  • Vinegar
  • Sugar

References

  • Farmers' Almanac: 7 Easy Ways to Make Your Roses Last Longer
  • Online Florists: Taking Care of Cut Roses to Promote Longevity
  • Good Housekeeping: Making Roses Last
Keywords: cut rose care, make roses last longer, cut rose life span

About this Author

Jennifer Loucks has over 10 years of experience as a former technical writer for a software development company in Wisconsin. Her writing experience includes creating software documentation and help documents for clients and staff along with training curriculum. Loucks holds a Bachelor of Science major from the University of Wisconsin - River Falls specializing in animal science and business.