• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How to Propagate Swedish Ivy

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How to Propagate Swedish Ivy

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Swedish ivy is a fast-growing, easy-to-grow house plant that is best planted in a hanging basket so its glossy leaves can freely cascade over the sides. Interestingly, Swedish ivy isn't an actual ivy, but is a member of the mint family, and you'll notice a light, refreshing mint aroma if you gently squeeze the plant's leaves. Swedish ivy is easily propagated by taking stem cuttings in spring or summer.

Step 1

Wipe a sharp knife with rubbing alcohol to kill any bacteria before you begin, then cut a 4 to 5-inch stem cutting from the tip of a healthy Swedish ivy. The cutting should have at least three or four leaves.

Step 2

Fill a pot with a good quality commercial potting mixture. The mixture should made of materials that will drain well, such as perlite, peat, vermiculite, or sand.

Step 3

Set the pot in a saucer of water, and allow the potting mixture to wick up water until the potting mixture if moist clear through, but not dripping wet.

Step 4

Pinch the lower leaves off the Swedish ivy cutting, leaving the top two leaves intact. Dip the tip of the cutting in rooting hormone, and plant it in the pot with the leaves above, and not touching the potting mixture.

Step 5

Put a plastic bag over the pot, and secure it with a rubber band. If necessary, put some stakes in the pot to keep the plastic from touching the Swedish ivy leaves.

Step 6

Put the pot a warm room, in bright, but indirect light. Although the plastic will act as a miniature greenhouse, and will keep the atmosphere humid, the soil should never be allowed to dry out. If the top of the soil feels dry to the touch, mist it lightly with a spray bottle.

Step 7

Remove the plastic from the pot when the Swedish ivy cutting has developed roots. You can determine this by pulling gently on the cutting, and if you feel a tug, the cutting has probably rooted. You may be able to see the tiny roots through the pot's drainage hole.

Things You'll Need

  • Sharp knife
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Commercial potting mixture
  • Pot with drainage hole
  • Saucer of water
  • Rooting hormone
  • Plastic bag
  • Stakes
  • Spray bottle

References

  • Texas A&M University System: Propagating Foliage & Flowering Plants
  • Plant-care.com: Swedish Ivy Latin Name: Plectranthus coleoides 'Marginatus'
  • University of Nebraska: Propagating House Plants
Keywords: ivy, swedish ivy, stem cutting

About this Author

M.H. Dyer is a long-time writer, editor and proofreader. She has been a contributor to the East-Oregonian Newspaper and See Jane Run magazine, and is author of a memoir, “The Tumbleweed Chronicles, a Sideways Look at Life." She holds an Master of Fine Arts from National University, San Diego.