• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

Root Structure of a Rose Bush

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

Root Structure of a Rose Bush

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Rose bushes are either grown in containers or in fields. Plants that are grown in containers have a fibrous root structure, while plants that are field-grown have a heavy root system. The root structure of a rose bush is an important part of its anatomy.

Purpose

The roots anchor the rose bush in the soil. They also transport water and nutrients to the rose bush.

Size

Two things determine the size of the root structure: the age of the rose bush and the density of the soil. Mature rose bushes have developed a large root system as opposed to newly-planted bushes.

Soil

Rose bushes that are planted in dense soil (fields) have developed a heavy root system by pushing through the dense soil. Rose bushes that have been grown in containers and have not had to push through dense soil have fibrous root systems.

Root-Bound

Rose bushes that have been left growing in containers for a long period of time will become root-bound. They will produce a large amount of fibrous roots that wrap around each other within the container.

Remedy

Root-bound rose bushes can be purchased and planted. Cut the roots before planting, by removing the bush from the container and slicing the fibrous roots selectively around the root ball (using a garden knife).

References

  • Rosemania: Anatomy of a Bareroot Rose
Keywords: rose bush roots, container fields dense soil, fibrous heavy system

About this Author

Paula M. Ezop’s inspirational columns "Following the Spiritual Soul" appeared in Oconee Today, a Scripps Howard publication. She has published her first book, "SPIRITUALITY for Mommies." "From Death to Living in the Light" and "Spiritual Intelligence" will be released by Eglomerate.com. Ezop has a BA degree from Northeastern Illinois University and has been writing for 10 years.

Member Calendar Entries