How to Save Begonia Seeds

Overview

Begonias are tropical and subtropical plants that thrive both indoors and out. These showy plants have foliage that's as compelling as its blooms, which come in a variety of colors. Begonia blossoms erupt in prolific clusters that inevitably draw attention and admiration. When you come across a particularly enchanting variety that you want to be able to enjoy year after year, just save its seeds and you'll ensure your ability to do just that, without any effort to find it again or any expense to keep buying the plants.

How to Save Begonia Seeds

Step 1

Locate the flower pods on your Begonia plant. These are the centers of the dried, spent blooms.

Step 2

Snip the flower pods carefully at the base. The flower stem should be at the point where it is beginning to dry and wither.

Step 3

Place the Begonia flower pods in a large paper envelope and allow them to dry completely. This could take one or two weeks.

Step 4

Label and date the envelope to identify the flower pods.

Step 5

Remove the flower pods from the envelope after they have dried completely and carefully open them over a pie plate to remove the Begonia seeds. Chaff from the flower pods will collect with the seeds in the pie plate.

Step 6

Separate the chaff by tilting the pie plate to one side so that the seeds roll away from the chaff.

Step 7

Discard the chaff and place the Begonia seeds in a small, labeled envelope.

Step 8

Store them in a cool, dry place away from extreme temperatures and humidity until you are ready to plant your new Begonias.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not store Begonia seeds in a sealed plastic storage bag. One seed that has not dried completely will ruin all the others.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper envelopes (large and small)
  • Aluminum pie plate

References

  • American Begonia Society: Raising Begonia from Seed
  • BradsBegoniaWorld.com: Growing That Darn Begonia Seed

Who Can Help

  • GardentoFarmer.net: Begonias and You
Keywords: harvesting Begonia seeds, propagating Begonias, storing flower seeds

About this Author

Patricia Hill is a freelance writer who contributes to several sites and organizations, including eHow.com, Associated Content and various private sectors. She is also the managing debt examiner for the Charlotte Examiner.