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How to Use Pop Bottles to Water Garden Plants

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How to Use Pop Bottles to Water Garden Plants

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Overview

Plastic pop bottles are the bane of environmentalists--and eco-conscious people--everywhere. When people throw them into a landfill, they don't biodegrade, and they simply take up a lot of space. Luckily, technology has found ways to reuse pop bottles, from shoes to playground equipment, but the easiest way has nothing to do with industrial technology. Use a plastic pop bottle in a variety of ways to help water your garden and other plants.

Step 1

Drill several small holes in the screw cap of a plastic pop bottle. Three or four are enough. You don't need to remove the cap to drill these holes.

Step 2

Fill the bottle with water or a liquid plant food solution that you mix up yourself.

Step 3

Loosen the cap slightly to allow some air into the bottle. Water your indoor plants as you normally would. Screw the cap back on tight, or replace the sprinkler cap with another cap to store the bottle.

Get to the Roots

Step 1

Prepare a sprinkler type top by drilling one or two holes in the top of the pop bottle.

Step 2

Cut the bottom of the bottle off and screw the cap tightly on.

Step 3

Bury the bottle several inches deep in the dirt at the roots of the plants you wish to water, top side down and fill the bottle with water or a solution of liquid plant food. Gravity will feed the water directly to the roots of the plant without washing away dirt.

Tips and Warnings

  • Before you cut anything with a razor knife, make sure your fingers are out of the path of the blade.

Things You'll Need

  • Several pop bottles
  • Electric drill
  • 1/16-inch drill bit
  • Razor knife

References

  • Pop bottle Irrigation system
  • 15 Ways to Recycle A Plastic Bottle in the Garden
  • Penn State University College of Agricultural Sciences
Keywords: pop bottle, garden bottles, bottle recycling

About this Author

Zoe Hartman is a freelance writer who specializes in alternative health, parenting and mental health topics. She has five years of mental health experience, training in herbalism, and a degree in psychology from Shepherd University. Her writing has appeared on eHow.com, Bright Hub, and Carrie and Danielle. She also writes for multiple private clients.