How to Root Flowers

Overview

All you need to get a flower cutting to grow is some moist soil and a flower that has bloomed. The best time to try to get the flower to root is when the last of the petals have fallen. Rooting flowers is an inexpensive way to increase your garden variety and size. This works well if you have been given a bouquet of flowers that you like or if your child has picked you a flower that you'd like to grow in your yard. Whatever the reason, with a few steps, it is possible to get flower cuttings to grow.

Step 1

Choose the flower that you want to root. If the flower has been cut, it will need to have a few leaves on it and will need to be cut straight across on the bottom of the stem. Choose a healthy, green leaf flower cutting. The cutting does not have to have a flower on it. You can cut a portion from the plant that is strictly greenery--just be sure to cut straight across on a node (the part of the stem that has leaves).

Step 2

Fill a clay pot with a good organic potting compost. Put two to three inches of sand at the bottom of the pot before you put in the compost. For best results, the compost should be moist but not saturated.

Step 3

Insert the cutting into the compost, about two inches down into the pot. The stems should stand alone without support. Remove all leaves that are at soil level.

Step 4

Place a freezer or sandwich bag on top of the cutting. This will act as a make-shift greenhouse for your plant and will keep humidity high and temperature warm.

Step 5

Set the pot in a sunny location such as a windowsill. A south-facing window generally will get the most sunshine during the day. The cutting will need at least eight hours of sunshine during the day.

Step 6

Remove the cutting from the compost once it has taken root. Gently pull it from the compost so that you do not damage the roots.

Step 7

Plant the rooted seedling into the soil outside during the spring after the last danger of frost. Given the right growing conditions, the plant will grow quickly. Some plants, such as the pelargoniums and some shrubs, will flower the same year that they are rooted. Carnations and other pinks will not bloom until the following year.

Things You'll Need

  • Container
  • Water
  • Compost
  • Plastic sandwich or freezer bag

References

  • Rooting a Cut Flower
Keywords: rooting a flower, root cut flowers, regrowing flower cuttings

About this Author

Melanie Hammontree has a master's in business and is working on a master's in journalism from the University of Tennessee. She is a member of the Society for Porfessional Journalists and has been writing for five years. Works include publications with Hall County Crime Examiner, Player's Press and The Gainesville Times.