How to Get Cane Begonias to Bloom

Overview

Cane begonias, such as the angel wing begonia, are a fibrous-rooted wax begonia. Unlike the tuberous versions often grown inside, most cane varieties are grown as houseplants, because they don't go completely dormant in winter. Begonias have abundant blooms and rich green foliage that makes them attractive most any time of year. While the foliage on its own adds interest to pots, the blooms are there main attraction. In order to encourage cane begonia flowering, proper care and maintenance are needed throughout the year.

Step 1

Plant cane begonias in a light potting mix. Create your own soil-less mix by combining one part peat moss, one part vermiculite and one part sterilized compost.

Step 2

Place begonias in indirect, bright light throughout the spring and summer. Use a shaded window. In fall and winter, move the begonia to a south or east facing window to provide more direct sunlight.

Step 3

Keep temperatures between 65 and 70 degrees F during the day, and five degrees lower at nigh,t during the blooming period. Too much heat or cold will cause the blossoms to drop or inhibit bud formation.

Step 4

Allow the soil surface to dry slightly between watering. Too much water inhibits blooming, as begonias cannot tolerate excessively wet soils.

Step 5

Fill the drip tray with small pebbles. Fill with water just to the top of the pebbles. Set the begonia pot on top. This provides humidity to the plant--a necessity for blooming.

Step 6

Use a flowering houseplant fertilizer every two weeks or according to label instructions. Alternately, use a slow release fertilizer formulated for flowering plants every two months.

Tips and Warnings

  • Lack of light and humidity are the two main reasons for lack of blooms. Placing a humidifier in the room during dry winters helps alleviate some of the issues.

Things You'll Need

  • Peat moss
  • Vermiculite
  • Compost
  • Pebbles
  • Fertilizer

References

  • University of Florida: Fibrous Rooted Begonias
  • Michigan State University Extension: Angelwing Begonia
Keywords: cane begonia, angelwing begonia blooms, flowering perennial

About this Author

Jenny Harrington is a freelance writer of more than five years' experience. Her work has appeared in "Dollar Stretcher" and various blogs. Previously, she owned her own business for four years, selling handmade items online, wholesale and via the crafts fair circuit. Her specialties are small business, crafting, decorating and gardening.