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The Best Flowers to Twine Around a Fence

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The Best Flowers to Twine Around a Fence

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One of the most attractive ways to finish off a country garden design is by gently twining flower vines over and around a fence. Not all flowers will take to this treatment, obviously, but those who do will add color and atmosphere with very little work past the original planting date. Plant the seeds and water with liquid fertilizer, then make sure that the plants are well-watered throughout the summer. Most vining plants will grow around and through the fence with very little, if any, training.

Honeysuckle

Vining honeysuckles grow in a variety of colors such as red, pink, yellow and white. They are a favorite of hummingbirds, and can grow up to 20 feet tall. Plant honeysuckle plants about 5 feet apart, compost them well and put mulch around the plant base to retain water.

Morning Glory

Morning glory is one of the most popular annual vines for the cottage garden look. Its glossy leaves and tough stems twine over chain-link fences and up strings, while the daily blooms are trumpet-shaped flowers in shades of pink, blue or white.

Moonflower or Moonvine

The moonflower or moonvine is to evening what morning glory is to daytime gardens. The moonflower will begin to open its large white trumpet-shaped flowers just about as the sun goes down. These annuals have very tough seeds coats. It is best to score them with a knife or scrape them with a file before planting, just to help the seed along in sprouting.

Sweet Peas

One of the more old-fashioned-looking vining flowers is the sweet pea. These plants come in many colors, from pinks and reds to pale yellows, and will bloom through the entire summer. Vines can grow as tall as 10 feet and have a very strong spicy and sweet fragrance.

Keywords: flowers twine around fence, twining flower vines, cottage garden look

About this Author

Anne Baley is a writer and photographer living in Southeast Michigan. Her degree in public law and government began a lifetime love of research, and has served her writing well. Baley has written articles for EndlessSunday.com, GardenGuides.com and hundreds of articles for eHow.com.