How to Plant Magnolia Stellata From Seeds

Overview

Magnolia stellata is alo referred to a star magnolia. It is a plant indigenous to Japan and is hardy in USDA zones 4 through 9. It is grown as a small tree, or shrub because it only grows to reach heights of 15 to 20 feet. The star-shaped, fragrant flowers of magnolia stellata vary from white to pink in color and are approximately 3 to 4 inches in diameter. The magnolia stellata prefers being grown in milder climates because frost can damage the blossoms as they form in spring.

Planting Magnolia Stellata Seeds

Step 1

Place 1 1/2 to 2 cups of moistened peat moss into a plastic resealable bag. Add to the bag the magnolia seeds and approximately 2 to 3 tbsp. of water. Close the bag but leave a small section open for ventilation. Put the bag in your refrigerator, or where it will remain approximately 35 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Leave the bag in the cold location for approximately two to three months.

Step 2

Spritz the contents of the bag every two or three days, or often enough to keep the bag of magnolia seeds well moistened. After two to three months, remove the bag from its cold storage location.

Step 3

Premoisten seed-starting mix until it's been well dampened down. Fill up 4-inch pots, or a seed starting tray, half from the top of the rim with the growing medium. Tap it down firmly until the soil is well compacted. Place two to three magnolia setallata seeds into each 4-inch pot. Scatter the seeds across the seed starting tray at approximately half to 1 inch apart. Cover up the magnolia stellata seeds with a half inch of the seed starting mix.

Step 4

Place the pots, or the tray, into a larger irrigation tray. Cover the pots, or tray, with clear plastic wrap. Or, place them inside of plastic bag.

Step 5

Put the tray into a location that will remain warm. Try to keep the temperatures between 65 to 75 F. Add water to the tray often enough to keep the soil moistened. When germination occurs, typically in four to six weeks, remove the plastic wrap, or bags. Place the tray near a light-giving source. Strive to provide the seedlings eight to 10 hours of light a day. Once the seedlings have grown to approximately 2 to 3 inches tall, transplant the strongest seedlings into larger growing receptacles.

Transplanting Magnolia Stellata

Step 1

Using 6-inch pots, fill them up three-quarters full with a good quality potting mix that contains some compost. Water each pot thoroughly until water is trickling out of the drain holes.

Step 2

Create holes in each pot that are three times the width of each seedling, but only lightly deeper, approximately 1 to 1 1/2 inches.

Step 3

Scoop out a magnolia seedling from the tray with a small spoon. Strike the rim of the pot to remove a magnolia stellata seeding from its pot.

Step 4

Set a seedling into one of the 6-inch pots. Keep the base of its stem just slight higher than the surrounding soil, approximately half to 1 inch.

Step 5

Scoop in soil slowly around the seedling until the hole is well filled. Water each seedling firming down the soil gently.

Things You'll Need

  • Magnolia stellata seeds
  • Seed-starting mix
  • 4-inch pots
  • 6-inch pots
  • Trowel
  • Plastic wrap, or plastic bags
  • Irrigation tray

References

  • Floridata: Magnolia Stellata

Who Can Help

  • U.S. National Arboretum: USDA Planting Zones
Keywords: magnolia stellata, star magnolia, magnolia growing