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What to Put in Water to Keep Cut Flowers Fresh

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What to Put in Water to Keep Cut Flowers Fresh

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For cut flower arrangements to last as long as possible, add some things to the water to increase their life. Lengthen cut flower freshness by a few easy ways other than water additions, such as making daily water changes and keeping the flowers away from a hot or cold air vent.

Soda

Putting ¼ cup of clear soda into vase water can extend flower life. It will make blooms last longer. While you can add colored soda pop to the mix, it is best not to do this in a clear vase as it will make the water brown.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Adding 2 tbsp. of sugar with 2 tbsp. of apple cider vinegar can help extend cut flower life. Make sure the water is changed daily and add a new batch of vinegar and sugar each time.

Vodka

An antibacterial, adding a few drops of vodka to the flower's water can help kill bacteria growth in the water. Adding a teaspoon of sugar can provide the flower with nutrients.

Sugar

Sugar is a key ingredient in several of these homemade flower extending formulas because it acts like a preservative. Mix 3 tbsp. with 2 tbsp. of white vinegar in a quart of water for a versatile mixture.

Aspirin

Crushed aspirin can add to flower life and keep blooms open longer before wilting. Change water every couple of days with a new crushed aspirin added each time.

Penny

Adding a penny to the water adds copper and with the addition of a sugar cube, it will help add nutrients to the water and keep the flowers living longer.

Keywords: cut flower arrangements, freshness, bouquet

About this Author

Tina Samuels has been a full-time freelance writer for more than 10 years, concentrating on health and gardening topics, and a writer for 20 years. She has written for "Arthritis Today," "Alabama Living," and "Mature Years," as well as online content. She has one book, “A Georgia Native Plant Guide,” offered through Mercer University; others are in development.

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