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List of Winter Plants

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List of Winter Plants

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When blooming through the top of the snow or showcasing their vibrant color, winter plants don't just survive the cold. They thrive and contribute texture, height and color variety to winter gardens. When your spring and summer plants take a break, winter plants can turn what would otherwise be chilly, barren empty space into a patch of life.

Camellias

These glossy, broad-leaf evergreen shrubs bloom in winter to late spring, producing pink, red or white flowers two to over five inches in diameter. They grow in acidic, humus-rich, well-drained soil but are susceptible to root rot, leaf spot, spider mites, aphids, scale insects, leaf hoppers and anthracnose.

Snowdrops

These bulbs bloom drooping, 1-inch white blossoms in late winter to early spring. Growing best in light shade, snowdrops can suffer from bulb flies, blight and nematodes.

Evergreen Holly

Over 400 varieties of holly exist, and the bright red berries and shiny green leaves of these plants make them a winter holiday favorite for use as decoration or adornment. Successfully grown all across the country, most holly plants prefer acidic soil and are drought tolerant.

Hellebores

Blooming in winter to early spring, these perennial plants showcase cup-like pink, green, purple and white flowers. Preferring sunlight during the cold season, hellebores can succumb to black rot, leaf spot, slugs and mildew.

Winter Aconites

When grown in fertile, moist, humus-rich soil in full sun or light shade, these slow-growing woodland plant bulbs produce one inch, buttercup-shaped yellow flowers. Slugs, snails, and smut disease like to feed on these flowers.

Witch Hazel

These deciduous shrubs sprout fragrant yellow, orange or red flowers in late fall or mid to late winter. Growing up to 15 feet tall, witch hazels thrive in light shade to full sun and well-drained soil but are susceptible to powdery mildew, leaf spot, gall, aphids, scale insects and leaf rollers.

Others

Spring heath and a variety of honeysuckle called Lonicera fragrantissima bud flowers in late winter to early spring.

Keywords: winter plants, flowers, winter gardening ideas, plants for winter

About this Author

Sable Woods worked as a staff member of her high school newspaper and co-editor of the yearbook. In addition to writing for Demand Studios, she has written articles for Associated Content, ELance clients, and for use in marketing websites.