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How to Trim Daylilies

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How to Trim Daylilies

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Overview

Daylilies are among the easiest and most carefree perennials to grow. There are thousands of varieties ranging in size from 12 to 48 inches tall and in a wide variety of colors. For these reasons, daylilies are extremely popular among gardeners. While the bloom on a daylily lasts just one day, the foliage remains throughout the season and can serve as a backdrop to other blooming plants and provide shade for the roots of the daylily itself, which daylilies like. To keep the plant looking good, trimming or pruning is required.

Step 1

Cut to the ground the stalk from which the flowers appear after the final blooms are spent. This will give the daylilies a neater appearance.

Step 2

Clip away any dead or dying leaves as they appear. Cut them to the ground. The leaves will turn a grayish-brown color, droop and lie on the ground. Cut these off and toss in a compost pile or throw into the trash.

Step 3

Trim the entire plant back to the ground after the season has passed, usually in the late fall. Daylilies that are classified as re-bloomers can be cut back to about 6 inches from the ground as soon as the first flush of blooms are spent.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not cut down the stalks until all of the blooms on the stalk are gone. Daylilies can have three or more blooms on one stalk.

Things You'll Need

  • Pruning shears

References

  • "Lilies;" Pamela McGeorge; 2004
Keywords: how to trim daylilies, how to prune daylilies, caring for daylilies, growing daylilies, daylilies

About this Author

Dena Bolton has written for local newspapers and magazines since 1980. She currently writes online for various sites, focusing on gardening. She has a BA in Political Science and German and graduate credits in Latin American Studies from East Tennessee State University. In addition, she is a TN Master Gardener.