How to Grow an Upside Down Tomato Plant

Overview

Growing tomato plants upside down is a good way to cultivate them in tight, urban spaces. Growing the plants upside down can also be a fun project for kids. Although commercial kits are available, making your own kit is very easy. With readily available materials, make your own hanging tomato kits. Hanging tomatoes, unlike tomatoes grown in the ground, require daily watering and regular fertilization. However, with care and time, your homemade hanging planters should produce good crops.

Step 1

Clean an empty 2L soda bottle. Remove the cap and throw it away.

Step 2

Cut about a 2-inch hole in the side of the bottle near the bottom. The size doesn't have to be exact. Add soil through this hole.

Step 3

Make a hole in the center of the bottom of the bottle for the eye bolt hanger.

Step 4

Cover the clear plastic with either duct tape or dark paint to protect the roots.

Step 5

Mix one part coconut hair, one part peat moss, one part pearlite, and one part hydroponic granulate. Although the 2L bottle is a good planter, it is small enough that water retention can be a problem. This type of mixture will hold water better than potting soils.

Step 6

Thread the roots of a young tomato plant through the neck of the bottle and spread them out inside the bottle.

Step 7

Fill the bottle with your homemade growth medium. Add 2 tbsp. of bone meal and 1 tbsp. of a balanced organic fertilizer.

Step 8

Hang the plant in a sunny location and water daily. Add 1 tsp. of organic fertilizer once a month.

Things You'll Need

  • 2L soda bottle
  • Eye bolt and nut
  • Drill
  • Duct tape or paint
  • Organic fertilizer

References

  • The Cheap Vegetable Gardener: Making your own upside down tomato planter
  • Gardening Tips n Ideas: Growing tomatoes upside down
  • Hydroponics 101: Granulates
Keywords: tomato gardening, urban gardening, kid's gardening

About this Author

Christopher Earle is a freelance writer based in Denver, Colo. He has been writing since 1987 and has written for NPR, The Associated Press, the Boeing Company, Ford New Holland, Microsoft, Active Voice, RAHCO International and Umax Data Systems. He studied creative writing at Mankato State University in Minnesota.