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How to Plant Wild Sarsaparilla Roots

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How to Plant Wild Sarsaparilla Roots

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Overview

Wild sarsaparilla is native to North America. This herbaceous perennial makes good ground cover for any woodland garden. Wild sarsaparilla roots can grow up to 24 inches tall with a 24-inch spread. They are hardy down to USDA zone 3. They have little white flowers in the early summer and berries in the fall that can be used in cooking. Planting wild sarsaparilla roots in your garden will give you access to this great plant all spring and summer.

Step 1

Choose a place in your garden to plant the wild sarsaparilla roots. Wild sarsaparilla roots like full to partial sun and well drained soil. They are not picky about soil type or pH.

Step 2

Dig holes for the wild sarsaparilla roots. Dig the holes as deep as the rhizomes and two times as wide.

Step 3

Place the wild sarsaparilla roots in the holes with the foliage above the surface of the soil. Fill the holes with soil and pat them down firmly with you hands.

Step 4

Water the wild sarsaparilla roots until the soil is moist.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not allow the soil around wild sarsaparilla roots to dry out or the plant may die.

Things You'll Need

  • Spade

References

  • Rook.org: Wild Sarsaparilla
  • Sun Valley Garden Center: Wild Sarsaparilla

Who Can Help

  • Rhode Island Wild Plant Society: Wild Sarsaparilla Aralia nudicaulis
Keywords: plant wild sarsaparilla roots, zone 3, wild sarsaparilla roots

About this Author

Hollan Johnson is a freelance writer for many online publications including Garden Guides and eHow. She is also a contributing editor for Brighthub. She has been writing freelance for over a year and her focus' are travel, gardening, sewing, and Mac computers. Prior to freelance writing, Hollan taught English in Japan. She has a B.A. in linguistics from the University of Las Vegas, Nevada.