Vegetable Plants That Need Compost Manure

Adding manure to your vegetable garden will help to improve the overall health of your plants. Sprinkle the manure around the vegetable beds and around your lawn to help control weeds. The nutrient-laden and rich manure allows the plant to retain moisture by warming the soil. Manure also assists in creating a porous environment and increases the fertility of the soil, ensuring your vegetables grow healthy and strong.

Corn

Corn will thrive in the nutrient-laden soil that manure helps to create. This tall crop not only loves full sun but needs a soil mixture that is full of nutrients and moisture. Adding manure around the corn crops increases the fertility rate, which helps to help to control weeds. Other root crops like carrots, if grown nearby, will have the added advantage of the rich soil full of nutrients.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers need a high amount of manure to flourish. Dig a hole to accommodate at least a half of the soil with manure and fill in the rest with remaining dirt. Mix the soil around and plant the cucumbers seeds on top of the soil in their own "hill". The rotting manure will warm the soil and the young vegetable plants will grow strong and hardy. Over the summer, and when the cucumbers begin emerging, add a thin layer of manure to help control weeds.

Cabbages

Cabbages and their similar "relatives", including broccoli and cauliflower, love manure. They thrive in a setting where they have been planted in soil containing manure and compost. When fertilized with manure, the heads of the vegetables develop faster thicker. The ability of the manure to help the soil become more porous also allows the cabbage plant to suck up these essential nutrients.

Potatoes

Potatoes need high amounts of manure. Because they take a few years to develop and produce vegetables, a yearly application of well-rotted manure is essential to prep the soil and seeds. By year two, you will have healthy potatoes ready to harvest.

Keywords: vegetable plants, composting manure, nourishing plants

About this Author

Callie Barber is a writer and photographer in North Carolina. Her work has appeared in Forbes and Automotive News magazine. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in international studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.