Information on Ayurvedic Herbs

Overview

Ayurvedic/Ayurveda medicine originated in India 3,000 years ago. Practiced worldwide, including in the United States, Ayurvedic medicine falls into the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) category, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Using the herbs, whether for medical purposes, cooking, or receiving a therapeutic massage are some ways people still use Ayurvedic medicine today.

Brahmi: Bacopa monnieri Scrophulaceae

The tropical herb, Brahmi: Bacopa monnieri Scrophulaceae, helps brain function and memory, according to The Reader's Digest Complete Illustrated Book of Herbs.

Gotu kola: Centella asiatica syn./Hydrocotyle asiatica Apiaceae

Gotu kola: Centella asiatica syn./Hydrocotyle asiatica Apiaceae has powerful traits that slow down aging, help heal burns and strengthen veins. The Chinese government documents that Professor Li Chung Yon lived to be 256 years old thanks to drinking tea with Gotu kola, according to the Illustrated Book of Herbs.

Albizia: Albizia lebbeck

Albizia: Albizia lebbeck treats asthma, hives, allergies and hay fever. It relieves allergic tendencies because it stabilizes the histamine cells, notes the Illustrated Book of Herbs.

Tumeric: Curcuma longa

Tumeric: Curcuma longa relieves psoriasis and inflammatory skin problems. A popular herb used for centuries, Tumeric can also be ingested to improve your immune system.

Boswellia: Boswellia serrata

Boswellia: Boswellia serrata provides relief from rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. According to the Illustrated Book of Herbs, Boswellia decreases pain and improves the body's range of motion, thereby making walking easier.

Warning

If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, then please do not use certain herbs as some may be harmful. Check with your medical doctor.

References

  • "Reader's Digest Complete Illustrated Book of Herbs;" Barbara Booth, project editor; 2009

Who Can Help

  • National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Keywords: ayurvedic medicine, healing herbs, India and ayurveda

About this Author

Michelle Bermas is a freelance writer and is currently working on a romantic comedy. She's been published in the "2008 Writer's Market," "The Social Cause Diet" anthology, "South Shore Living" magazine, "Balloon Life" magazine, "The Boston Globe" newspaper, "The Patriot Ledger" newspaper, MA, and more. She has a Bachelor of Arts from Pace University, New York.