Types of Tropical Flowers

Tropical plants are those that can live and survive tropical climates. Full sun, heat, humidity, sandy salty conditions, all of this is something that a plant will need to withstand. Plants that are tropical can have exotic looks and textures and can bring real fire and pizazz to the garden plot.

Blunt Leaved Peperomia

Blunt Leaved Peperomia, or Peperomia obtusifolia, is from the Piperaceae, or pepper, family. It is an evergreen perennial. Leaves are 6 to 9 inches on vinelike stems. Tiny greenish white flowers are against dark green foliage. It prefers a light organic soil in filtered light or medium shade. High humidity is not a problem for blunt leaved peperomia. It can be propagated via division, stem cuttings, or leaf cuttings.

Cigar Plant

Cigar Plant, or Cuphea ignea, is from the Lythraceae, or loosestrife, family. It is an annual or perennial, fast growing, and good for the beginner to grow. It can attract hummingbirds and butterflies. It will get to 3 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Leaves are dark green and 1 to 1.5 inches long. Pinch the stem tips back so that it will maintain the dense shape. The plant requires full sun but tolerates partial shade. It can be grown from stem tip cuttings in spring or summer or from seed.

Papaya

Papaya, or Carica papaya, is from the Caricaceae, or papaya, family. It is a fast growing edible plant good for the beginner gardener. It gets 6 to 20 feet tall with leaves up to 24 inches wide. Fruits are rose, orange, yellow, or green and can get up to 20 pounds even though 1 pound is the norm. It requires fertile well drained soil and full sun. It can be propagated via seed, but cuttings, or grafting to the root stock of a seedling.

Poinsettia

Poinsettia, or Euphorbia pulcherrima, is from the Euphorbiaceae, or spurge, family. It is a perennial that is evergreen and fast growing. It can get to 10 feet and have dark green leaves. Flowers are very tiny in garden varieties, smaller than the store bought cultivars. It prefers full sun or has a tolerance for shade. To propagate this plant one uses cuttings in the summer.

Keywords: tropical plants, plants that are tropical, tropical climate

About this Author

Tina Samuels has been a full-time freelance writer for more than 10 years, concentrating on health and gardening topics, and a writer for 20 years. She has written for "Arthritis Today," "Alabama Living," and "Mature Years," as well as online content. She has one book, “A Georgia Native Plant Guide,” offered through Mercer University; others are in development.