Perennial Flower Information

Overview

Perennial flowers' leaves, stems and blossoms all die back once the fall frost hits them, while their roots continue to survive underground. In regions with cold winters, you should mulch perennial flower beds to help the plants survive the winter.

Time Frame

Perennial flowers grow for several years. Some types of perennials are short-lived and only last three to four years.

Benefits

Perennial flowers do not have to be planted every year. By deadheading dying flowers, you can encourage a perennial to flower all season.

Warning

Remove the foliage after it dies back. Old foliage can harbor diseases and insects.

Sources

Perennial flowers are available from nurseries, garden centers and mail-order companies. Mail-order companies tend to offer more variety than other sources.

Types

Perennial flowers include African lily, baby's breath, chrysanthemum, purple coneflower, gerbera daisy, hollyhocks, iris, lavender, lupine, pinks, red hot poker, sea thrift, strawberry geranium, violet and yarrow.

References

  • North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension
  • North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension
  • North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension
Keywords: perennial flowers, winter protection, perennial care

About this Author

Karen Carter has spent the last three years working as a technology specialist in the public school system. This position included hardware/software installation, customer support, and writing training manuals. She also spent four years as a newspaper editor/reporter at the Willapa Harbor Herald.