How to Plant Blueberries

Overview

Blueberries are a very low maintenance fruit to grow at home. Blueberries generally start producing fruit in the third season after planting and become fully productive by the sixth year, thereafter producing fruit for many years. Harvesting time is in the month of July and berries are ready for picking when they are uniform in color and twist off easily.

Step 1

Choose a location for your blueberry plants where they will receive full sun for at least 4 to 6 hours daily. Blueberries do best in full sun but can tolerate some afternoon shade.

Step 2

In the spring after the last chance of frost has passed till the ground. Blueberries do best in acidic soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.0. If you have alkaline soil adding humus and peat moss can help to make it more acidic.

Step 3

Dig a hole 18 x 18-inches deep and wide for each blueberry plant. Space your plants about 5 feet apart and the rows 10 feet apart.

Step 4

Set a blueberry plant in each hole and fill in with additional soil. The top of the root ball should be level with the ground's surface. Lightly tamp down the soil around the plant.

Step 5

Water your blueberry plants well after planting. It's important to keep your blueberries well watered during the active fruiting stage. Blueberries need approximately 1 to 2 inches of water weekly. It is not necessary to water after the end of September through the winter time.

Step 6

Apply a 4-inch layer of mulch in a 2 foot diameter around the blueberries. This helps the soil retain moisture so that less frequent watering is needed; the mulch will also control weeds.

Step 7

Fertilize the blueberries about four weeks after planting with a 10-10-10 fertilizer for fruit plants. Feed your plants again six to eight weeks later in the summer. Keep the fertilizer 6 inches away from the trunks of the plants.

Things You'll Need

  • Tiller
  • Humus
  • Fertilizer
  • Mulch

References

  • "Taylor's Master Guide to Gardening Book"; Houghton Mifflin Co.; 1994
Keywords: blueberries, planting berries, growing blueberries

About this Author

Amy Madtson has been writing primarily childbirth-related articles for 15 years. Her experience includes teaching childbirth education and providing labor assistance since 1993, and her goal is to educate women about their options during the childbearing years. Madston's writings have appeared in both online sources and local area publications.