How to Grow Salvia Divinorum Indoors

Overview

Salvia divinorum is a psychoactive plant the originates from Oaxaca, Mexico. Many countries and states in the U.S. have outlawed this plant for its psychoactive properties. However, there are still many states where the plant is legal for use and growing. The plant is a member of the mint family. Traditionally, it was used by Mazatec shamans to divine the nature of an illness and to aide in healing. You can add salvia to your own indoor medicinal garden if you can obtain a cutting from another plant. Plants are sometimes sold at online metaphysical herb stores. Seeds are extremely rare, and difficult to germinate.

Step 1

Cut a stalk from a salvia plant that has four to six sets of leaves, and at least 4 inches of stalk under the last set of leaves.

Step 2

Fill a jar with water and put your stalk into the water so that the entire branch is covered up to the first set of leaves. Cover the jar and salvia branch with an upside down larger jar. Spray a mist of water over the leaves once a day, and add water to the glass so that the water level remains the same. Watch for the roots to appear within one to two weeks. Let the new root nodes grow to ¾ inches in length.

Step 3

Fill your plant pot half full with perlite. Add equal parts sandy loam, peat moss and compost to the remaining part of the pot. Mix the soil together evenly.

Step 4

Transplant your cutting so that the stem is covered with soil up to the first set of leaves.

Step 5

Water your plant daily with enough water to moisten the soil. Spray mists of water over the leaves in hot weather once or twice a day.

Step 6

Put your plant under a grow light for 14 to 16 hours a day to discourage flowering and more leaf growth.

Things You'll Need

  • Small jar
  • Large jar
  • Spray bottle
  • Perlite
  • Sandy loam
  • Peat moss
  • Compost
  • Fluorescent grow light

References

  • Cultivating and Propagating Salvia Divinorum

Who Can Help

  • I Am Shaman: Buying Salvia Plants
Keywords: psychoactive plants, medicinal plants, sage of the divine

About this Author

Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Robin Coe has reported on a variety of subjects for over 15 years. Coe is the former publisher of the politics and art magazine Flesh from Ashes. She has worked to protect water and air quality. Coe holds a Bachelor of Science in journalism with a double-major in international politics from Bowling Green State University.