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How to Build a Garden Fence From Branches

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How to Build a Garden Fence From Branches

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Overview

In the medieval garden, fences were used to define the shape of the garden, create raised beds and keep livestock out. Many of these garden fences were short fences known as wattle fences and were often constructed of sticks that the gardener picked up wherever he could find them. You can give your garden the same rustic flair by creating your own wattle fence from sticks that you find yourself.

Step 1

Soak your sticks in water overnight to make them pliable.

Step 2

Define the edges of your fence by laying garden hoses along the desired fence line. Leave an opening for wheeling garden tools in and out of your garden. No gate is necessary, because you can easily step over your fence.

Step 3

Pour ordinary baking flour along the outside of your garden hose to make a line that you can pound the logs through. Baking flour is more environmentally friendly than spray paint.

Step 4

Pound the support logs one-third of the way into the ground with a mallet. Space these logs approximately 2 feet apart.

Step 5

Weave the sticks in and out of the upright logs as if you were weaving a basket.

Step 6

Tuck the ends of each stick behind logs to secure them.

Things You'll Need

  • Logs, 4 to 5 inches in diameter and 3 feet long
  • Green sticks, 1/2 inch in diameter or smaller, and at least 3 feet long
  • Mallet
  • Flour
  • String

References

  • Make Simple, Beautiful Garden Fences and Trellises
  • The Lost Art of Wattle Fencing
  • Wattle Fencing

Who Can Help

  • Wattle Fence Plan
Keywords: wattle fence, willow fencing, stick supports, garden fencing

About this Author

After 10 years experience in writing, Tracy S. Morris has countless articles and two novels to her credit. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers, including "Ferrets" and "CatFancy," as well as the "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World," and several websites.