How to Top Dress With Peat Moss

Overview

For a lusher, greener lawn, organic lawn care advocates are turning to peat moss as a solution. Peat moss loosens soil and allows air to reach plant roots, while holding moisture. This prevents the need for frequent watering and helps conserve water. Because peat moss holds nutrients, it is also healthier for plants than commercial fertilizers. Applying peat moss as a top dressing is simple.

Step 1

Top-dress your lawn late in the fall. This prevents weeds from benefiting from the process.

Step 2

Rent a commercial soil aerator from a local gardening supply store.

Step 3

Run the soil aerator over your lawn. A soil aerator removes plugs from your lawn and allows water, nutrients and oxygen to get past the dense mat of plant roots at the soil line and into the deep roots of the grass that are under the soil.

Step 4

Rake up all grass plugs and discard them.

Step 5

Calculate the amount of peat moss you need for your yard. A 3.8-cubic-foot-sized bag of compressed peat moss will cover 180 square feet if you apply it at a depth of ½ inch.

Step 6

Place peat moss in a wheelbarrow and wheel it to the site of application.

Step 7

Apply the peat moss to your lawn at a depth of ½ inch. Work the peat moss into the grass roots with a leaf rake.

Step 8

Water your lawn with a garden hose and sprinkler until it is saturated. There should be an inch of water standing on the surface of the soil.

Things You'll Need

  • Commercial soil aerator
  • Shovel
  • Wheelbarrow
  • Lawn leaf rake
  • Garden hose
  • Sprinkler

References

  • Easy Care Lawns & Lawn Repair Tips
  • w to "top-dress" a lawn with organic matter
  • Peat Moss

Who Can Help

  • Why is Peat Moss so Important?
Keywords: peat moss, fertilizer, yard improvements

About this Author

After 10 years experience in writing, Tracy S. Morris has countless articles and two novels to her credit. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers, including "Ferrets" and "CatFancy," as well as the "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World," and several websites.