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How to Dry Hydrangea Blooms

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How to Dry Hydrangea Blooms

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Overview

The almost spherical blooms of the hydrangea bigleaf make it a perfect choice for drying. Some blooms can be as much as 8 inches across. The blue or pink blooms from the Mophead variety of hydrangea are the most popular for drying. The two common methods for drying hydrangea blooms are upright and upside-down. You can place dried hydrangea blooms in a vase or other container for a continuing reminder of summer or use them in crafts or decorations, like on a wreath or tucked into openings on a Christmas tree for a Victorian theme.

Upright Drying For Display in a Container

Step 1

Choose the vase, basket or other container in which you want to display the dried flowers.

Step 2

Look for blooms on the hydrangea shrub that are completely open. Make the cut at a 45-degree angle on the cane so the stem is about one and half times the height of the container.

Step 3

Snip or tear off all the leaves on each stem.

Step 4

Continue to cut and arrange the leaf-less blooms in the container. Shorten the stems of some of the blooms to provide varying heights in the container. You will be able to cut the stems after the blooms have dried, if you prefer to wait.

Step 5

Place the container in a location indoors away from direct sunlight. Depending on the humidity level, the blooms should take about one week to dry.

Upside-Down Drying

Step 1

Gather the blooms by following Steps 2 and 3 above with this exception: Cut the stems at varying lengths and no shorter than 6 inches to make them easier to handle.

Step 2

Wrap tape or string around one stem at a leaf or bud node. Leave enough length to the tape or string to be able to tie it for hanging. Wrap each stem individually so they can hang without touching one another.

Step 3

Attach the stems with the tape or string to a clothes hanger or other device with the blooms hanging down. Space the blooms far enough apart so the blooms do not touch each other. By using stems of varying heights, you can fit more blooms closer together on the hanger.

Step 4

Hook the hanger over a closet pole, on a door knob or on a drawer knob (open a drawer partially). Hydrangea blooms take less than a week to dry.

Step 5

Cut the tape or string free of the hanger after the hydrangea blooms are dry. When using the blooms in crafts, you will likely cut off the stems, so you do not need to remove the tape and string from the stems.

Things You'll Need

  • Clippers
  • Container
  • Masking tape or string
  • Hanger

References

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Hydrangeas! Hydrangeas!
Keywords: drying hydrangea blooms, dried hydrangea blooms, crafts

About this Author

Barbara Raskauskas is a certified e-learning specialist and certified Microsoft Office specialist. She has written web content, technical documents and course material for a decade. Raskauskas now writes how-to's, product reviews and general topics published on several websites, including Demand Studios.