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How to Prune Meyer Lemon Dwarf Trees

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How to Prune Meyer Lemon Dwarf Trees

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Overview

The Meyer lemon tree is a cross between a lemon and orange tree. Used as an ornamental plant due to its size (between 6-10 feet), these trees are easy to care for and can be trained to grow as small as you like. Pruning a Meyer lemon tree regularly ensures that the tree is free of disease, that the branches are getting enough sunlight and making it possible for the tree to grow the most fruit possible.

Pruning

Step 1

Wait to prune the tree until it is 3-4 feet tall. Pick all the fruit off the tree once it is ripe. At the end of the season, remove any dead branches from the tree. Cut dead, weak or diseased branches to the base of the tree.

Step 2

Take off any long and wispy stems that cannot bear the weight of fruit from the tree. Remove branches from the tree that are thinner than a pencil. Cut these branches or pinch them off using the hand.

Step 3

Remove branches that are crossing each other or limbs that are touching each other. If two limbs are touching remove the weakest of the two branches.

Step 4

Stand away from the plant and look at its shape. The plant should be fuller at the bottom and thin at the top to allow sunlight into the tree. If the tree is too tall for your liking cut branches from top to shorten it. If required use a ladder to cut any branches you can not reach easily. Cutting from the top trains the plant to grow to a certain height.

Things You'll Need

  • Pruning shears or scissors
  • Ladder

References

  • Growing Lemon Trees Indoors: 6 Basic Tips
  • How to Care For a Meyer Lemon Tree
  • How to Prune a Meyer Lemon Tree
Keywords: Meyer Lemon Tree, Pruning Indoor Citrus, Pruning Trees

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.