How to Prune a Pink Bower Vine Plant

Overview

Pink bower vine, known botanically as pandorea jasminoides, is a flowering perennial climbing vine native to sub-tropical regions. It is hardy in USDA Zones 9b through 11 and can be grown as an annual in cooler climes. Pink bower vine is a long season bloomer producing flowers from late spring into winter. It performs best and is most verdant when grown over a structure such as an arbor, loggia, garden shed or even a sturdy fence.

Step 1

Maintenance prune your pink bower vine to remove damaged vines and foliage and spent blooms throughout the growing season. Pluck spent blooms with your hands and cut vines and foliage off neatly with clean sharp secateurs. Develop a routine of examining the plant for any problem spots during watering time to catch problems early and prevent the spread of disease or other damage.

Step 2

Shape prune your jasmine several times a year to conform to a topiary, espalier, low hedging or other groomed shape or design. Cut off growing tips at least 1/4-inch above a leaf node to encourage bushy branching and increased flower production. Shape prune in the spring after any threat of frost has passed or in the early fall, skipping pruning during the heat of summers. Remove up to but no more than 1/3 of the vines foliage bulk in any one pruning session to minimize stress on the plant.

Step 3

Hard prune your pink bower vine by shearing off the top foliage when it becomes damaged by frost, wind or becomes misshapen by neglect and needs to be refreshed. Cut off all damaged vines down to the crown of the plant and pull each cut piece from the plant mass before making subsequent cuts. If the entire plant is dying, leave as much green living tissue as you can and cut down the rest. Water the plant deeply and feed with a highly diluted solution of balanced fertilizer to encourage new growth.

Things You'll Need

  • Secateurs
  • Long handled loppers

References

  • Universitiy of Florida IFAS
  • Austrailian Native Plants Society
Keywords: pink bower flowering vine, pandorea jasminoides, bower plant

About this Author

An omni-curious communications professional, Dena Kane has more than 17 years of experience writing and editing content for online publications, corporate communications, business clients, industry journals, as well as film and broadcast media. Kane studied political science at the University of California, San Diego.