How to Grow Mexican Teosinte

Overview

Mexican teosinte is an annual warm-season grass introduced from Mexico. It is used to provide food and shelter for birds and wildlife such as turkeys and doves. Mexican teosinte is also used as silage for livestock. Mexican teosinte grows up to 15 feet in height and has coarse branches. The leaves are sword-shaped and range between 13 to 48 inches long. Mexican teosinte is commonly found growing along wetlands and prefers fertile soil.

Step 1

Plant Mexican teosinte in June in southern states like Florida. If irrigation is available and a greater yield is preferred, planting can begin as early as April.

Step 2

Plow the area where you plan to grow the Mexican teosinte. Alternatively you could use a shovel to turn over soil in place of a plow. Make sure all debris, including weeds and rocks, are cleared from the area. Rake the surface down to create a level and smooth growing area.

Step 3

Place the seeds 1 to 2 inches deep in the soil ,and create rows every 5 to 10 inches. Use 8 to 10 pounds of Mexican teosinte per acre of land.

Step 4

Water the plants once or twice a week for the first month or until they become fully established. Place a soaking hose at the base of each plant until soaked, around 2 to 3 minutes per plant.

Step 5

Fertilize the teosinte based upon a soil test. Requirements are similar to most grain crops but must be determined with the precision of a soil test.

Things You'll Need

  • Plow
  • Shovel
  • Rake
  • Mexican teosinte seeds
  • Hose
  • Fertilizer

References

  • Mexican Teosinte Fact Sheet: USDA
Keywords: Mexican Teosinte, growing Mexican teosinte, propogating teosinte

About this Author

Callie Barber has been writing professionally since 2002. Barber's love for design and writing inspired her to create Design Your Revolution, a blog that shares creative and affordable ways to decorate indoor and outdoor living environments. Her articles have appeared on Travels.com and GardenGuides.com. Barber holds a Bachelors of Arts in international studies from the University of North Carolina.