How to Grow Vegetables Organically Without Pesticides

Overview

To qualify as organic produce, plants must be grown in soil that is not treated with chemical pesticides for at least three years. The plants also cannot contain more than 5 percent pesticide residue. For the home gardener, organic growing is as simple as utilizing some basic pantry options for insect control.

Aphids

Step 1

Mix a serving of nonfat dry milk according to the package instructions and place the liquid in a spray bottle.

Step 2

Spray the milk on the plant leaves that are plagued by aphids. The aphids will stick to the milk as it is drying and die.

Step 3

Rinse the liquid from the leaves with a hose or watering can.

Spiders

Step 1

Mix 1/2 tsp. of dishwashing liquid and 1 qt. of water in a spray bottle.

Step 2

Flush the leaves and undersides of the plant thoroughly .

Step 3

Allow the leaves to dry. Do not rinse them off.

Whiteflies

Step 1

Cut out small squares of yellow poster board with scissors. Whiteflies are attracted to anything that is bright yellow.

Step 2

Cover the board pieces in petroleum jelly.

Step 3

Place the board pieces near susceptible plants. The whiteflies will stick to the jelly.

Step 4

Recoat the poster board when it dries out.

Grasshoppers

Step 1

Plant a basil border around vegetable beds. Basil is a favorite food of grasshoppers, so they will feed on it instead of the vegetables.

Step 2

Maintain the basil at least 6 inches away from your produce to prevent the grasshoppers from feeding on both.

Step 3

Brew a basil tea every two weeks and pour it around the hedge area to enhance the smell and appeal for grasshoppers. Do not pour the tea too close to the vegetables.

Ants

Step 1

Boil 3 gal. of water on the stove, then pour the water into anthills as they appear. For best results, use this approach when the ants are active and near the surface.

Step 2

Mix 1 part borax with 1 part confectioner's sugar in a container and shake well.

Step 3

Sprinkle the mixture around ant holes, in the garden, and around the borders of the yard. Ants will bring the mixture back to their hills and poison the colony with the borax.

Things You'll Need

  • Nonfat dry milk
  • Spray bottle
  • Dishwashing liquid
  • Yellow poster board
  • Scissors
  • Petroleum jelly
  • Basil plants
  • Borax
  • Confectioner's sugar

References

  • "The Queen of Clean's Complete Cleaning Guide;" Linda Cobb; 2002
Keywords: organic produce, organic growing, organic insect control

About this Author

Ann White is a freelance journalist with prior experience as a Corporate and Business Attorney and Family Law Mediator. She has written for multiple university newspapers and has published over 300 articles for publishers such as EHow and Garden Guides. White earned her Juris Doctor from Thomas Jefferson School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in English literature.