How to Treat an Amaryllis Bulb

Overview

Amaryllis are foolproof tropical bulbs that are potted up and brought into bloom indoors during winter. They come in a variety of colors including white, pink, red and bi-color stripes. They produce a group of flowers at the top of a single stem. The flowers are large and showy--some can be as large as dinner plates. With proper care an amaryllis can re-bloom year after year.

Step 1

Water your potted amaryllis bulb when you get it home. Thereafter, water only when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. Do not over water amaryllis.

Step 2

Put the amaryllis is a sunny position such as a south-facing window or in a sun room.

Step 3

Fertilize every other week with a water soluble fertilizer mixed according to the manufacturer's recommended rate of application.

Step 4

Provide support for the flower stalk. Insert a 24-inch high bamboo stake or an amaryllis support trellis into the potting soil to keep the pot from toppling over when the flower blooms.

Step 5

Cut off the flowers when they fade. Make the cut at the top of stalk, just below the flower head.

Step 6

Cut off the stem just above the nose of the bulb when it turns yellow.

Step 7

Water and fertilize normally. Leave your amaryllis in a sunny position until the leaves begin to turn yellow, then cut them back about 2 inches from the bulb nose.

Step 8

Remove the bulb from the pot and store it in a cool, dark spot for a rest period of at least 6 to 8 weeks.

Step 9

Re-pot your amaryllis bulb 8 to 12 weeks before you want the flowers to bloom. Use regular indoor potting soil and a 6-inch pot with a drainage hole in the bottom. Cover the drainage hole with a stone and position the bulb so that 1/3 of it is above the top of the pot.

Things You'll Need

  • Water soluble fertilizer
  • Bamboo stake or amaryllis support trellis
  • Scissors
  • Indoor potting soil
  • 6-inch pot with drainage hole

References

  • Grow Amaryllis Bulbs.
  • Amaryllis Bulb Care.
Keywords: treat amaryllis bulb, re-bloom amaryllis bulb, force amaryllis bulb

About this Author

Sharon Sweeny has a college degree in general studies and worked as an administrative and legal assistant for 20 years before becoming a professional writer in 2008. She specializes in writing about home improvement, self-sufficient lifestyles and gardening.