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How to Cut Lucky Bamboo Plants

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How to Cut Lucky Bamboo Plants

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Overview

Lucky bamboo grows well in indirect light, making it the perfect indoor plant. As long as you maintain your lucky bamboo in non-fluoridated water, keep its water at a more or less constant level, and change the water every week or two, you can expect your bamboo plant to last for years. If you're ready to share your lucky bamboo with a friend, want to make more stalks for another arrangement or are just hoping for a bushier, thicker bamboo plant after a bit of pruning, cutting stalks off a lucky bamboo plant is simple.

Step 1

Locate a joint in the bamboo stalk at about the height you'd like to cut. The joint will look like a faint ridged ring that reaches all the way around the stalk.

Step 2

Grasp the upper portion of the stalk in one hand and carefully slice all the way through it, perpendicular to the stalk, just above the joint.

Step 3

Place the upper portion of the newly cut stalk in a shallow bowl of water.

Step 4

Pour small stones--large aquarium gravel and perlite both work well--into the shallow bowl to help stabilize the stalk. Care for the stalk just as you do for the parent bamboo plant, maintaining the water at a constant level. Roots will grow below that water level.

Step 5

Mist the cut portion of the stalk--the part still remaining on the parent plant--with water from a spray bottle to stimulate growth of a new bud near the cut.

Things You'll Need

  • Sharp knife
  • Small bowl
  • Large aquarium gravel
  • Spray bottle

References

  • Esprit de Isle
Keywords: indoor plants, feng shui, greenery

About this Author

Marie Mulrooney has written professionally since 2001. Her diverse background includes numerous outdoor pursuits, personal training and linguistics. She studied mathematics and contributes regularly to various online publications. Mulrooney's print publication credits include national magazines, poetry awards and long-lived columns about local outdoor adventures.

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