How to Replant Daffodil Bulbs

Overview

Daffodil bulbs return each spring with bright yellow blooms, while underneath the soil they busily produce new bulbs. Eventually, the spring will come when your daffodils don't flower as profusely as usual. Daffodil bulbs need to be dug up, divided and replanted approximately every three years or the crowding caused by the new bulbs prevents flowering. You might also wish to replant the bulbs to a new area of your garden, especially if your landscaping design has changed. Wait until the daffodils stop flowering and the foliage has begun to yellow, usually early to midsummer, before digging and replanting.

Step 1

Dig around each clump of bulbs, leaving the leaves intact. Dig about 8 to 10 inches down in a circle around the bulbs. Lever the spade under the bulbs and lift them out of the soil.

Step 2

Pick up the bulbs by the leaves near where they emerge from the bulbs. Gently brush off the excess soil from them.

Step 3

Divide the clump of bulbs. Look for two or more bulbs that are attached. Grasp one bulb in one hand while holding the other bulb in the other. Twist or pull gently until the bulbs snap apart.

Step 4

Prepare a well-drained garden bed in full to partial sun. Lay a fresh 2- to 3-inch layer of compost onto new or existing beds and work into the soil to improve drainage and soil nutrition.

Step 5

Dig replanting holes for each bulb to a depth four times the width of the bulb. Space holes 5 inches apart.

Step 6

Place each bulb in a hole with the root side down and the leaves on top. Fill in the hole with soil and firm lightly with your hand.

Step 7

Water the bulbs well. Don't remove the leaves until they yellow completely and die, as they are storing nutrients for next spring's blooming period.

Tips and Warnings

  • Dispose of any diseased or rotted bulbs. Look for soft spots or bruising on the bulbs. Avoid replanting when the bulbs are still flowering. The shock might kill them and they will likely stop flowering immediately even if they survive.

Things You'll Need

  • Spade
  • Compost

References

  • Texas A&M Extension
  • University of Minnesota Extension
Keywords: replanting daffodils, dividing bulbs, transplanting spring bulbs

About this Author

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.