How to Overwinter Gerbera Daisies

Overview

Overwintering Gerbera daisies can be a challenge if you do not live in hardiness zones 8 and below. They are a tropical flower that will bloom year round in places like Africa and southern Florida. However, there are a few things you can do to save your daisy plant from being killed by the first good winter frost.

Step 1

Plant your Gerbera daisy in a plant pot suitable for its size. You want the roots to have room to grow, but not so big of a pot that it is hard to handle. Since the root mass grows rather large over time, it is good to keep it in a pot as it does not do well with transplanting.

Step 2

Sink the pot into the soil of your garden once the soil has warmed to 40 degrees in the evenings. This will help it to get the outside light and moisture during the summer months.

Step 3

Lift the pot out of your garden when the days get shorter and the nights drop into the 40s F. Clean off the outside of the pot and bring it indoors. Place it on a drainage tray and water only when the soil seems dry. Keep it in a sunny room. If your winter stays cool but not cold, you may be able to save the plant by mulching it heavily.

Step 4

Fertilize the plant indoors only once a month and keep any blooms trimmed after they fade. Some plants will bloom indoors, but the plant should live until the weather warms again in the spring.

Step 5

Move the potted plant back outside when the weather has warmed the outside soil to at least 40 degrees. Sink it into the soil as in Step 2, unless it seems that the plant has outgrown its pot. Overgrown plant's roots can be cut in half and each section put in a new pot.

Things You'll Need

  • Plant pot
  • Potting soil
  • Fertilizer
  • Shovel
  • Sunny window

References

  • ACES Publications: Greenhouse Productions of Gerbera Daisies
  • Hortchat.com: Gerbera Daisy
Keywords: gerbera daisies, flowers perennials, tropical wintering

About this Author

Maryland resident Heide Braley is a professional writer who contributes to a variety of websites. She has focused more than 10 years of research on botanical and garden articles and was awarded a membership to the Society of Professional Journalists. Braley has studied at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.