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How to Care for Potted Roses in Winter

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How to Care for Potted Roses in Winter

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Overview

Potted roses have many advantages. Their containers can be moved from place to place to be enjoyed where you want. They also can be rotated around to receive evenly-distributed amounts of light. While potted roses can be brought in during the cold winter months, some care is still needed for them to thrive to their greatest potential.

Step 1

Bring potted roses indoors in the fall, before the first frost. While roses planted in the ground can survive most winters, potted roses do not have the insulation to keep their roots warm. Place the roses near a sunny window. Alternatively, wrap the bottom of the container with a blanket and add several inches of mulch in areas with mild winters. The roses will go dormant like outdoor roses. Bring them indoors to a cool location, such as a garage, if you have a colder than usual winter so they can continue their dormancy without damage.

Step 2

Continue to keep your indoor roses moist to enjoy their foliage all winter long. Fertilize them monthly with a rose fertilizer and follow the label instructions.

Step 3

Cut back damaged or diseased branches as well as suckers that grow near the base of the trunk. Roses brought indoors are like roses grown in subtropical climates in that they need pruning twice a year (August and March). In March, prune your roses (indoors and outdoors). Generally, you should prune roses back to about half their size. Thin out the bush as well to encourage better light in the center of the plant.

Things You'll Need

  • Blanket
  • Mulch
  • Fertilizer
  • Clippers

References

  • FlowerStore.com
  • University of Florida: Growing Roses
Keywords: care container roses winter, prune roses indoors, Fertilize indoor roses winter

About this Author

Melissa Lewis is a former elementary classroom teacher and media specialist. She has also written for various online publications. Lewis holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.