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How to Kill Bugs on House Plants

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How to Kill Bugs on House Plants

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Overview

If your house plants aren't thriving, it may not be for a lack of light or watering. Instead, it might be a problem with bugs. We don't tend to think of our house plants as attracting insects, but unfortunately it is a common problem. Tiny gnats, white flies and spider mites all are common infestations in house plants. Check your plant and the soil for tell-tale signs of insects. Look for sticky areas, tiny bits of white fluff, and scaly residue, then take action to rid your plants of these nasty little bugs.

Step 1

Isolate the plant. Move it away from any other nearby plants to stop the insects from spreading.

Step 2

Dry out the bugs. Dip a cotton swap in rubbing alcohol and rub it along the stems and undersides of the leaves where bugs tend to hide. This will kill the bugs almost instantly.

Step 3

Suffocate the remaining bugs. Add one tablespoon of liquid dish soap to a pint of water. Place the liquid in a spray bottle and spray the plant with the soapy water. If the water is sudsy, this is even better, as the suds will suffocate the bugs.

Step 4

Re-pot the plant. Often, bugs hide in the soil. Remove the plant and shake off excess soil, then set it gently aside. Dump the old soil. Wash out the pot with a mixture of warm water and bleach; about one cup of bleach per gallon of water. Let dry, then add fresh, new potting soil and re-plant.

Things You'll Need

  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Cotton swab
  • Liquid dish soap
  • Spray bottle
  • Bleach
  • Fresh potting soil

References

  • Evergrowing: Houseplant Bugs and Pests

Who Can Help

  • Old-Fashioned Living: How to Identify Houseplant Bugs
Keywords: house plants, bug killer, insects

About this Author

April Sanders has been a professional writer since 1998. She has worked as an educator and now writes academic research content for EBSCO Publishing and elementary reading curriculum for Compass Publishing. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in social psychology from the University of Washington and a master's degree in information sciences and technology in education from Mansfield University.