How to Winterize Veronica

Overview

Veronica--also known as speedwell--includes annuals, perennials and sub-shrubs. The mat-forming perennial grows upwards to 18 inches and has spires of pale blue flowers. This plant is easy to grow and will grow in soil that is quite poor, making this a good choice for rock gardens, south-facing banks and slopes or flowerbeds. In warm Southern gardens, Veronica is an evergreen. Dividing and watering Veronica will keep this flower healthy throughout the winter.

Step 1

Select the site to transplant the Veronica. They need full sun only; they do not tolerate any other light.

Step 2

Prepare the new site. Several weeks before transplanting, dig down about 8 inches and add compost or well-rotted manure and a light application of granular, slow-acting fertilizer.

Step 3

Transplant the Veronica in the fall, to allow time for the plant to settle in the new site before winter. Lift the plant out of the ground and use a sharp knife to divide it into smaller sections. Replant only healthy flower sections.

Step 4

Dig the hole for the new transplant. It needs to be deep enough so that the top of the root is level with the top of the hole.

Step 5

Place the root ball into the hole and add soil around the roots to fill in the hole. Tamp down gently and water thoroughly. Space Veronicas 18 inches apart.

Step 6

Keep the soil around Veronica consistently moist. It does not have to be rich, but the plant will suffer during winter . These plants need about one inch a week, either through rainfall or through regular watering.

Step 7

Cover the ground with a 2-inch layer of mulch. This will help retain soil warmth and moisture through cold months.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Compost or well-rotted manure
  • Fertilizer
  • Knife
  • Mulch

References

  • The Complete Garden Flower Book: Catie Ziller, Publisher; 2001

Who Can Help

  • Cornell University, Herbaceous Perennials: Veronica Gentianoide
Keywords: perennials, Veronica, winterizing flowers

About this Author

After attending Hardin Simmons University, Kay Dean finished her formal education with the Institute of Children's Literature. Since 1995, Dean has written for such publications as "PB&J," Disney’s "Family Fun," "ParentLife," "Living With Teenagers" and Thomas Nelson’s NY Times bestselling "Resolve." An avid gardener for 25 years, her experience includes organic food gardening, ornamental plants, shrubs and trees, with a special love for roses.