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How to Grow Crocosmia Lucifer

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How to Grow Crocosmia Lucifer

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Overview

Crocosmia Lucifer is an easy to grow perennial with sharp leaves, similar to the day lily, and bright red flowers that will heat up any garden. Hardy from zones 5 to 9, Crocosmia Lucifer can be grown in a variety of climates, as long as they lack a winter with temperatures under -20 degrees Fahrenheit. With a height of 3 to 4 feet, these flowers will surely make a statement when they bloom.

Step 1

Choose a spot to plant your Crocosmia Lucifer. They need full sun, but will tolerate a number of soil types, from sandy to clay, acidic to alkaline.

Step 2

Plant your Crocosmia Lucifer in the early spring. Dig one hole for each bulb, about 3 to 4 inches deep and 2 inches in diameter. Space each hole about 1 to 2 feet apart. Place the bulbs in the holes and cover with soil. Pat down firmly.

Step 3

Water your Crocosmia Lucifer regularly, about twice a week for five minutes each watering.

Step 4

Divide your Crocosmia Lucifer after 2 years, when it begins to crowd itself. Replant at a depth of 4 to 5 inches.

Step 5

Place mulch over the Crocosmia Lucifer in the winter to protect it from killing frosts.

Step 6

Fertilize the soil around the Crocosmia Lucifer in the spring with compost or manure.

Tips and Warnings

  • Crocosmia Lucifer can be invasive in parts of California.

References

  • Crocosmia 'Lucifer'
  • Crocosmia 'Lucifer' Information

Who Can Help

  • About Crocosmia 'Lucifer'
Keywords: how to grow Crocosmia Lucifer, growing Crocosmia Lucifer, Crocosmia Lucifer growth tips

About this Author

Hollan Johnson is a freelance writer and contributing editor for many online publications. She has been writing professionally since 2008 and her interests are travel, gardening, sewing and Mac computers. Prior to freelance writing, Johnson taught English in Japan. She has a Bachelor of Arts in linguistics from the University of Las Vegas, Nevada.