How to Protect Canterbury Bells

Canterbury Bells image by dazamlwch/ photobucket

Overview

Canterbury bells, also known as campanula or bellflower, can be annual, biennial or perennial. About 300 species exist, and depending upon the variety, these flowers' heights range from 3 inches to 5 feet tall with tubular to saucer-shaped blossoms. Due to the wide variety of species, care for Canterbury bells varies, and some flowers require protection from wind, pests and disease.

Step 1

Stake taller varieties of Canterbury bells to protect them from blowing over in strong winds. Use a plant support purchased from a garden center or use twine to secure the plant to a bamboo cane or dowel rod.

Step 2

Sprinkle a ring of diatomaceous earth, crushed eggshells or wood ash around the flowers to protect Canterbury bells from slugs and snails.

Step 3

Prevent rust fungus from developing on Canterbury bells. Plant them in a garden site with good air circulation. Direct water toward the roots of the plant and avoid getting the leaves wet. Remove any affected plants or plant parts to prevent them from spreading to other plants. Do not add these to the compost. The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station states, "Although not usually necessary, applications of fungicides can be made when new growth emerges in the spring."

Things You'll Need

  • Plant support, bamboo cane or dowel rod
  • Twine (optional)
  • Gardening shears
  • Diatomaceous earth, eggshells or wood ash
  • Fungicide (optional)

References

  • Burpee Complete Gardener; Barbara W. Ellis, Editor; 1995
  • The Complete Flower Garden Book; Catie Ziller, Publisher; Murdoch Books; 2001

Who Can Help

  • University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program: Snails and Slugs
  • Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station: Canterbury Bells, Plant Health Problems.
Keywords: perennials, plant diseases, plant pests

About this Author

After attending Hardin Simmons University, Kay Dean finished her formal education with the Institute of Children's Literature. Since 1995, Dean has written for such publications as "PB&J," Disney’s "Family Fun," "ParentLife," "Living With Teenagers" and Thomas Nelson’s NY Times bestselling "Resolve." An avid gardener for 25 years, her experience includes organic food gardening, ornamental plants, shrubs and trees, with a special love for roses.

Photo by: dazamlwch/ photobucket