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Anthurium Facts

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Anthurium Facts

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Anthurium Facts image by Anthurium by green-thumb/Flickr.com
Anthurium Facts image by Anthurium by green-thumb/Flickr.com

Overview

Anthuriums are blooming houseplants with lacquered-looking flowers that tend to fool people into thinking that they are artificial. When cut, the flowers can last two to three months. The anthurium is an upright plant with 20-inch tall stems and long, leathery green leaves.

Other Names

Other common names for anthuriums are tailflowers and flamingo flowers.

Flowers

Anthurium flowers are 3 to 6 inches long. The color range is from a deep red to a pink or white. Some blossoms are even speckled.

Temperatures

Anthuriums like warm climates year-round. They prefer 85-degree F days and 65 degrees F at night. To encourage blooming, reduce the nighttime temperature to 60 degrees F for six weeks.

Moisture

Anthuriums need constant moisture and high humidity when actively growing. Let the soil dry a little between waterings.

Uses

Anthuriums are sold commercially as cut flowers. They are also grown in containers for use in interiorscapes and landscapes in warm climates.

Warning

Anthurium is toxic to the taste and touch. It causes irritation of the mouth and digestive system. It causes skin and eye irritation with external contact with the sap.

References

  • North Carolina Cooperative Extension: Anthurium spp.
  • Hawaii Cooperative Extension Service: Anthurium Cultivars for Container Production
  • The Practical Gardener's Encyclopedia; Geoffrey Burnie; 2000
Keywords: anthurium, blooming houseplant, toxic

About this Author

Karen Carter spent three years as a technology specialist in the public school system and her writing has appeared in the "Willapa Harbor Herald" and the "Rogue College Byline." She has an Associate of Arts from Rogue Community College with a certificate in computer information systems.

Photo by: Anthurium by green-thumb/Flickr.com