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How to Plant a Tiger Canna

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How to Plant a Tiger Canna

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Overview

Tiger cannas, also known as Bengal tiger cannas, are grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 7 to 11, although they do best in zones 8 to 10. Tiger cannas are fast growing cannas that can reach six feet tall. They have large banana-like leaves with bright orange flowers. Plant cannas outdoors after the last frost. You can also plant tiger cannas indoors in large pots in March.

Step 1

Choose a location in full sun and in soil that is well-draining. Soil that is consistently moist is best so you won't have to water it as much. A spot near a water source like a pond or marsh is ideal. If planting indoors, place your tiger canna near a sunny window in a container with drainage holes.

Step 2

Dig a hole that is deep enough so that the tip of your tiger canna's rhizome (root ball) is four to five inches beneath the soil. The hole should also be two to three times as wide as the rhizome. If planting in a container, use all-purpose potting soil.

Step 3

Place your rhizome in the center of the hole with the tip facing up. Spread the roots along the bottom. Backfill the soil and tamp it down to remove any air pockets.

Step 4

Water immediately. This is essential. Tiger cannas need moist soil. Continue to water as needed throughout the growing season. If you are growing your tiger canna in a pot, place it in a second container of water for constant moisture, if desired.

Things You'll Need

  • Trowel
  • Large Container
  • Potting Soil

References

  • Iowa State University
  • Bengal Tiger Canna
Keywords: bengal tiger canna, grow tiger canna, growing cannas

About this Author

Melissa Lewis is a former elementary classroom teacher and media specialist. She has also written for various online publications. Lewis holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.