How to Winterize Wand Flower

Wand flower image by Kenpei, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sparaxis_tricolor1.jpg

Overview

Wand flowers are a perennial native to South Africa. With their colorful blooms and long, wand-like stems, it is no wonder these flowers make a splash in so many gardens. But what are you supposed to do when winter comes around? Wand flowers are hardy from zones 6 to 10, but that doesn't mean you can just leave them in your garden and do nothing. If you want beautiful wand flower blooms next spring and summer, proper winter preparation is a must.

Step 1

Trim back the wand flower stems to about six to eight inches in height to allow for natural die-back. Trim after the first freeze.

Step 2

Add compost or manure to the soil around the base of the wand flowers. Work into the soil to a depth of about two to three inches.

Step 3

Cover the wand flowers with a light layer of mulch to protect them from a freeze. Cover with about five inches of mulch.

Step 4

Water your wand flowers until the ground freezes. Stop watering until the ground is no longer frozen.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not cut the stem too short on the wand flowers when trimming them for winter or the whole plant may die.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden scissors
  • Mulch
  • Compost or manure

References

  • Winterizing Perennials

Who Can Help

  • How to Prepare Perennials for Winter
Keywords: winterizing wand flowers, how to winterize wand flowers, wand flower winterize tips

About this Author

Hollan Johnson is a freelance writer and contributing editor for many online publications. She has been writing professionally since 2008 and her interests are travel, gardening, sewing and Mac computers. Prior to freelance writing, Johnson taught English in Japan. She has a Bachelor of Arts in linguistics from the University of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Photo by: Kenpei, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sparaxis_tricolor1.jpg