How to Grow Meadow Brome

Overview

Meadow brome is a cool season grass native to Asia and typically found in foothills and mountains. The primary use of this grass is for forage, specifically in pastures and hay production. Highly palatable to all livestock and wildlife, meadow brome also provides exceptional erosion control. When grown under optimal conditions, brome can reach heights between 2 and 6 feet.

Step 1

Plant meadow brome seedlings in full sun and in early to mid-spring for a healthy and vigorous plant that will begin to sprout in mid-July to early August.

Step 2

Clear the planting area of weeds that will hinder the growth and development of the meadow brome. Plant the seeds ¼ to ½ inch deep in the soil using a no-till drill. Ideal seeding rate is 20 seeds per square foot.

Step 3

Create a firm seedbed by raking over the soil to make sure all rocks and stones are gone. Tread lightly on the soil and you now have a firm seedbed.

Step 4

Water the seeds after planting; they prefer fertile and well drained gravelly soil, so don't over-water.

Step 5

Treat brome grass with fungicide to reduce the chance of being infected with head smut. A soil borne fungus, smut affects the tassels of the grass and creates silvery-white membrane around the plant.

Step 6

Don't graze in the spring until the forage is at least 9 to 12 inches high. Allow a 4-week resting period between grazing.

Things You'll Need

  • Seedlings
  • No till drill
  • Rake
  • Soil
  • Water
  • Fungicide

References

  • United States Department of Agriculture
Keywords: growing meadow brome, establishing meadow brome, how to grow brome

About this Author

Callie Barber has been writing professionally since 2002. Barber's love for design and writing inspired her to create Design Your Revolution, a blog that shares creative and affordable ways to decorate indoor and outdoor living environments. Her articles have appeared on Travels.com and GardenGuides.com. Barber holds a Bachelors of Arts in international studies from the University of North Carolina.