How to Grow Tall Oatgrass

Overview

Tall oat grass is a perennial bunchgrass originally grown in Europe, where it was a key part of the grasslands. This grass prefers full sun and low, fertile soils. The stems range from 2 to 5 feet high, and are usually knee-bent at the base. The dark green stems of the base have a middle section that contains golden and bright green leaves. Soft in texture, the leaves are long and broad. Tall oat grass is found growing along seashores, meadows, hills and mountains. Beginning in the second growing season, tall oat grass is typically used for livestock forage.

Step 1

Grow tall oat grass from spring seedlings for a healthy and vigorous plant that will sprout in early summer. Frequently found in fields, oat grass prefers well-drained soil.

Step 2

Clear the planting area of weeds and other plants that will hinder the growth and development of the oat grass. Plant the seeds in the spring in low, fertile soils. Tall oat grass prefers a firm seedbed planted 1/4 inch deep in the soil.

Step 3

Water the seeds thoroughly after planting; they prefer clay and gravelly soil with medium moisture content, so don't over water. Apply lime and fertilizer to ensure a hardy crop. During the first year, apply herbicides to the oat grass to help control weeds.

Step 4

Don't graze during the first year to allow the formation of a robust root system. Once the tall oat grass has become established, manage the grass by mowing and grazing.

Tips and Warnings

  • Contact your local agricultural extension office before applying herbicides.

Things You'll Need

  • Tall oatgrass seedlings
  • Soil
  • Herbicide

References

  • United States Department of Agriculture
Keywords: growing tall oatgrass, pruning oatgrass, establishing tall oatgrass

About this Author

Callie Barber has been writing professionally since 2002. Barber's love for design and writing inspired her to create Design Your Revolution, a blog that shares creative and affordable ways to decorate indoor and outdoor living environments. Her articles have appeared on Travels.com and GardenGuides.com. Barber holds a Bachelors of Arts in international studies from the University of North Carolina.