Types of Ficus Trees

Types of Ficus Trees image by Forest and Kim Starr/Hear.org, Pictures/Southerntropicals.com, Pictures/Kusal.com

Ficus trees are a favorite plant of many homeowners as a tree to add to the decor of their home. Ficus trees are easy to care for and will withstand wintry days indoors for weeks on end without losing their leaves. Several popular varieties of tropical ficus trees can be grown indoors in pots as houseplants as long as they are given the proper care.

Weeping Fig (Ficus Benjamina)

Weeping fig does well in front of a sunny window but will tolerate some shade. It has glossy olive green leaves, sometimes with a white edge. It can grow to be a massive tree more than 50 feet high if left outside, but indoors it can be confined to a pot. Give it a good soaking and then allow to drain. If the leaves droop, it needs more water. If the leaves get brown spots, it has too much water and needs to dry out between watering.

Rubber Tree (Ficus Elastica)

This tree was named for the milky latex sap that flows from its leaves and branches. Its large glossy, dark green leaves add a sophistication to any room. The tree is easily grown in indirect light and constant moisture. Leaves can be dusted and buffed to a glossy sheen.

Fiddle-Leaf Fig (Ficus Lyrata)

This large violin-shape leaf ficus will actually bear flowers and fruit (inedible) under the right conditions, usually outside. It likes indirect light and will grow slowly indoors with little care. Usually a good soaking once a month will provide enough moisture. Make sure the tree dries out between watering.

Longifolia (Ficus Alii)

This popular ficus is an oriental-looking tree with its narrow leaves and often braided trunk. It is a hybrid bred for growing in pots indoors. It requires very low care and likes indirect light. Many silk ficus trees are mimics of this plant.

Keywords: ficus trees, house plants, room decor

About this Author

Maryland resident Heide Braley is a professional writer who contributes to a variety of websites. She has focused more than 10 years of research on botanical and garden articles and was awarded a membership to the Society of Professional Journalists. Braley has studied at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.

Photo by: Forest and Kim Starr/Hear.org, Pictures/Southerntropicals.com, Pictures/Kusal.com